Metrics

  • visibility 465 views
  • get_app 174 downloads
description Journal article public PCD Journal

Pakistan: Civil-Military Relations in a Post-Colonial State

Ejaz Hussain
Published 2012

Abstract

This article has attempted to explain why the military has remained a powerful political institution/force in Pakistan. Its purpose was to test a hypothesis that posited that the colonial authority structure and the 1947 partition-oriented structural dynamics provided an important structural construct in explaining politics and the military in post-colonial Pakistan. To explain and analyse the problem, the study used books, journals, newspapers and government documents for quantitative/ explanatory analysis. The analysis has focused on the military in the colonial authority structure in which the former, along with the civil bureaucracy and the landed-feudal class, formed an alliance to pursue politico-economic interests in British India. The article has also explained and analysed the partitionoriented structural dynamics in terms of territory (Kashmir) and population (Indian refugees). The findings proved that these ‘structural dynamics' have affected politics and the military in Pakistan. The theoretical framework in terms of ‘praetorian oligarchy' has been applied to structurally explain colonial politics as well as politics and the military in Pakistan. The study treated Pakistan as a praetorian state which structurally inherited the pre-partition ‘praetorian oligarchy'. This praetorian oligarchy constructed ‘Hindu India' as the enemy to pursue politico-economic interests. The military, a part of praetorian oligarchy, emerged from this as a powerful political actor due to its coercive power. It has sought political power to pursue economic objectives independently.

Full text

 

Metrics

  • visibility 465 views
  • get_app 174 downloads